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Cover Letter Body Paragraph Example

It took weeks to find *this* job. It took hours to get your resume right.

 

Almost there. You just need a cover letter.

 

The problem?

 

You only get one shot.

 

You can’t just write a cover letter. It has to be perfect.

 

But… How do you write the perfect cover letter?

 

You know—the kind of letter that will make the employer call you up in the middle of the night?

 

Give us 10 minutes and you’ll know how to write a cover letter like that.

 

This guide will show you:

 

  • How to write a cover letter better than 9 out of 10 others.
  • A sample cover letter that will get you more interviews (and why).
  • Cover letter writing tips and hacks to boost your chances of landing a job.
  • Actionable ideas on how to start and end a cover letter, plus how to address it.

 

Ready? Take a look at this basic cover letter sample. What do you think makes it so special?

 

An example of a cover letter format for every job made with our resume and cover letter builder.

 

Read on! We’ll break down the formula in 8 simple steps.

 

The Secret Behind Every Successful Cover Letter?

 

See, all great cover letters have something in common: they’re based on a proven, effective template. Here’s what I mean:

 

Meet Jane, the candidate who wrote the cover letter above. She’s applying for a digital marketing manager position with a pharmaceutical company, XYZ Corp. The company is planning to launch a new flagship website.

 

Jane’s experience and knowledge make her a perfect candidate for this role. The purpose of her cover letter is to prove that she’ll be able to replicate her past success in the new position.

 

Right, so you’ve seen a perfect example of a cover letter for a job.

 

Now, let me explain what makes this sample cover letter great and how you can use this cover letter outline to make the most of each section.

 

1

Use a Professional Cover Letter Header

 

Yup, the basics first. The header of every professional cover letter for a job application should include the following:

 

  • Your name
  • Your telephone number
  • Your email address
  • The date
  • The name of the hiring manager and their professional title
  • The name and address of the company to which you’re applying

 

Optionally, you can add:

 

  • Your professional title
  • Your home address
  • Links to your professional websites
  • Your social media accounts (applicable only for LinkedIn and Twitter)
  • Your city of residence (it’s not mandatory but adds a professional touch—include it if your cover letter is highly official)

 

Just remember to keep it professional:

 

  • Use an email address from a respected provider—that means either Gmail or your personal domain (if you have one.)
  • Your email address should only include your first and last name—sexyvanessa@gmail.com or johnlikesgoats@hotmail.com will be deal-breakers.
  • Don’t use your current work email. It’s impolite to both your current and potential future employer.
  • Make sure your contact information is consistent across your resume, cover letter, and social media profiles.

 

Pro Tip: Writing a cover letter with no name of the hiring manager available? In the addressee section include only the name of the department: for example, “XYZ Sales Department.”

 

Want to save time and have your professional job application ready in minutes? Here are a sample cover letter and a matching resume made with our resume and cover letter builder. Write your cover letter and resume here.

 

Resume and a sample cover letter for a job application. See +15 resume and cover letter templates and create your job application here.

 

2

Open Your Cover Letter with a Proper Greeting

 

Who do you address a cover letter to?

 

Directly to the hiring manager who’ll read it.

 

The greeting of your cover letter (i.e., the salutation) might be the very first thing the hiring manager sees. There’s one great, foolproof strategy to make your greeting catch her attention:

 

Dear Katherine,

 

That’s right. Her name.

 

If we hear or see our name, we react. Focus on what comes next. There’s a lot of science behind this:

 

Once the hiring manager sees her name in the greeting of your cover letter, she’s going to feel like she’s found something tailored specifically for her. It will feel personal, she’ll know whatever comes next might just be the exact information she’s been looking for.

 

All of the following are good examples of professional cover letter greetings.

 

Sample cover letter greetings:

 

  • Dear Katherine,
  • Dear Miss Jones,
  • Dear Ms. Smith,
  • Dear Mrs. Ford,
  • Dear Mr. McConnor,

 

Pro Tip: Wondering whether you should use the hiring manager’s first or last name? That depends on the company culture. If you’re applying for a position with a relaxed, casual company, use the first name. For corporate cover letters, it’s safer to go with the addressee's last name.

 

How do you find out the hiring manager’s name?

 

Do some research!

 

There are multiple ways to find out who your hiring manager is. You can learn about them in our dedicated guide: How to Address a Cover Letter: Sample & Guide [20+ Examples]

 

If you’re unable to find the name by any means possible, you’ll need to write a cover letter to whom it may concern.

 

Who to address a cover letter to if there’s no name of the hiring manager provided?

 

Have a look at those sample cover letter to whom it may concern greetings:

 

  • Dear Sales Team Hiring Manager,
  • Dear Hiring Manager,
  • Dear [XYZ Company] Team,
  • To Whom It May Concern

 

Pro Tip: If you’re not living in Victorian England, don’t start a cover letter with “Dear Sir or Madam.”

 

Done with the header and greeting? Now it’s time for the meat and potatoes. The central paragraphs of your cover letter.

 

How to get them right?

 

Go for the three paragraph cover letter format:

 

  • The first paragraph to grab the hiring manager’s attention
  • The second to show what you’ve got to offer
  • The third to prove that you’ll fit in

 

Want to learn more about best professional cover letter formats? Read our guide: Cover Letter Formats: A Complete How-To Guide [10+ Examples]

 

Now, have a look at a quick breakdown of the cover letter main body.

 

3

Write a Catchy Opening Paragraph

 

Here’s the brutal truth:

 

These few sentences at the beginning of your cover letter will determine whether the hiring manager will read on.

 

You need to make your cover letter introduction attract and hold the hiring manager’s interest.

 

Have a look at these two sample cover letter opening paragraphs:

 

How To Make a Cover Letter—Opening Paragraph

  

wrong

In response to your posting for the Digital Marketing Manager, I would like to express my interest in taking part in the recruitment process. As a digital marketing manager with 8+ years of experience, I am positive that I would be successful at this role.

 

Why is it so bad?

 

Because it provides no value and no details. The bottom line is basically “I’ve already done this job so I think I’d fit in.” That’s not what the hiring manager is looking for.

 

Now, see a properly written cover letter opening example:

 

right

As a lifelong enthusiast of XYZ’s marketing initiatives, I was thrilled to see your posting for the position of Digital Marketing Manager. I am positive I can help with XYZ’s upcoming challenges. I have experience with leading successful national online campaigns with budgets over $300,000. What is more, I have succeeded at expanding ABC’s client base by 19% since 2011.

 

“Wow, I’d have to be a lunatic not to hire her!”

 

That’s the response this cover letter first paragraph will bring.

 

There are a few different, effective strategies for your cover letter opening. You can highlight your achievements, show how well you know your prospective employer’s needs, or base the intro on your enthusiasm.

 

Even professional writers struggle to make a perfect intro to their pieces. We know that starting a cover letter can be daunting, that’s why we’ve put together a dedicated guide for you. Give it a read: How to Start a Cover Letter: Sample & Complete Guide [20+ Examples]

 

4

Explain Why You’re The Perfect Candidate

 

You see a job posting from your dream employer. The name of the job is the same as your current position. You’ve been a very successful professional so far.

 

This means, to get that job you just have to show off your best assets in your cover letter, right?

 

Wrong!

 

Your cover letter is not a trophy case.

 

So—

 

What to write in a cover letter’s second paragraph?

 

You need to get the hiring manager exactly what she’s looking for. You have to show that you’re going to satisfy the company’s specific needs.

 

Remember Jane, our digital marketing manager candidate? The XYZ company to which she’s applying needs:

 

  • First of all, a savvy digital marketing manager (1).
  • And, on top of that, someone who will supervise the development of their new online portal (2).

 

Let’s have a look at how Jane managed to show that she’s both (1) and (2).

 

How To Make a Cover Letter—Second Paragraph

 

Sample cover letter for a job application in digital marketing:

 

In my current position at ABC, I have supervised all phases of our online marketing initiatives, both technical and creative (1). Last year, my key challenge was to design and optimize nine product websites for ABC’s most strategic products and improve our SEO results as well as enhance the UX (2). Here we are a year later:

 

  • Eight of the nine websites I optimized have achieved and secured their spot in the top 3 results on Google (2). These are organic, non-paid results for 10+ key search terms;

 

  • The incoming search engine traffic to all nine websites comprises 47% of the total organic traffic (2) for key terms and phrases.

 

See how it’s done?

 

In the first sentence, show that you’re an expert in your field. But don’t keep on bragging. The remaining part of your cover letter’s second paragraph should be all about how your previous experiences will help your future employer press ahead with their plans.

 

Job seekers impress employers by identifying transferable skills related to new positions. People often apply to new positions, so it’s likely you’ll not have the exact experience requested. But employers would rather know how your past experiences will inform future decisions. You were a hostess? Relate those management and organizational skills to the Executive Assistant position.

 

What if you’re creating a cover letter for an internship and don’t have a wealth of professional experience to present? Don’t worry, we’ve got a dedicated guide to show you how to write a good cover letter and land your dream internship: How to Write a Cover Letter For an Internship [+20 Examples]

 

5

Tell Them Why You’re Eager to Join

 

Your future employers have needs. If they’re willing to hire you, it’s because they think you’ll satisfy those needs.

 

But what they also want is for you to actually enjoy working with them. They want your future job to feel rewarding to you—that way, they know you’re more likely to stay with them for a longer period of time.

 

The key to writing a perfect cover letter third paragraph is showing the hiring manager why you want this job, not just any job.

 

Here’s the easiest way to do it:

 

  • Start with a company fact - for instance, an upcoming project (1)
  • Say why you find it interesting (2)
  • Reiterate that your experience and knowledge will let you succeed with the project (3)

 

Have a look at this cover letter example:

 

How To Make a Cover Letter—Third Paragraph

 

I know that XYZ’s current plans involve developing a comprehensive online portal focused on healthcare-related issues (1). This project is a perfect match for my personal and professional interests and an exciting opportunity to create a unique online base of knowledge for patients and healthcare professionals (2). I would love to leverage my knowledge of SEO marketing and online growth marketing to achieve groundbreaking results with this initiative (3).

 

Pro Tip: How long should a cover letter be? In general, relevant and short cover letters are best. Three paragraph tops. Your go-to word count shouldn’t exceed 300 words.

 

Wondering how to write a good cover letter for a job application when there’s no job offer? Want to see some general cover letter writing tips? Read our handy guide, 35+ Successful Cover Letter Tips, Advice & Guidelines (With Examples), and find out about effective cover letter strategies for different types of cover letters!

 

6

Make Your Offer in the Closing Paragraph

 

So far so good:

 

Your cover letter shows that you have relevant skills. You’ve explained your motivation. What could possibly go wrong?

 

Actually, a lot.

 

You still have a cover letter ending to write. And it’s the decisive part.

 

It has to amplify the general impression you’ve made with the previous paragraphs. It has to make the hiring manager excited as she starts reading your resume.

 

How to make the best cover letter ending?

 

Long story short: by providing value.

 

Tell the hiring manager that you’re looking forward to meeting in person and discussing how your experience and knowledge can help your future employer in fulfilling their goals.

 

Like in this cover letter example:

 

How To Make a Cover Letter—Closing Paragraph

 

I would welcome the chance to discuss your digital marketing objectives and show you how my success at ABC can translate into digital and online marketing growth for XYZ.

 

Two worst cover letter mistakes you can make in the final paragraph are:

 

  1. Coming off needy - focusing on how much you want the job, not on whatyouhave to offer.
  2. Repeating the cliched phrase “Thank you for your consideration and your time.”

 

There are some easy tricks you can use to write an effective cover letter closing paragraph. Make sure to read our guide, How to End a Cover Letter: Sample & Complete Guide [+20 Examples] and check them out!

 

7

Use the Right Formal Closing

 

Once you’ve written the body of your cover letter, you just need to put a formal closing at the very end.

 

Write “sincerely” and follow it with your full name. Adding your handwritten signature is optional, but it’s recommended for more formal cover letters.

 

If you’re not a fan of the well-worn, “sincerely,” feel free to use any of the following synonyms:

 

Sample cover letter sign-offs:

  

  • Thank you,
  • Best regards,
  • Kind regards,
  • Sincerely,
  • With best regards.

 

The ones listed above are going to be your safest bets. Still not what you’re looking for?

Have a look at some alternative cover letter sample salutations:

 

  • Thank you for your consideration,
  • Regards,
  • Sincerely yours,
  • Yours truly,
  • Respectfully yours.

 

Pro Tip: It’s a good idea to repeat your basic contact information, such as your LinkedIn profile, email address and telephone number below your sign-off.

 

8

Add the Postscript: A Great Cover Letter Hack Nobody Uses

 

All of the above sections are must-haves in a good cover letter format.

 

But there’s one special trick you can use:

 

The postscript.

 

Why is the “P.S.” so important?

 

Because it’s like a magnet for the hiring manager’s eyes. It screams: “you cannot miss this information.”

 

Use the postscript to tell the hiring manager about something impressive about your career (1), even if it’s not strictly related to the job opening.

 

And say that you’d be happy to provide them with more details (2) if they find it interesting.

 

Like in our cover letter example:

 

How To Write a Good Cover Letter Postscript

 

P.S. — I would also value the opportunity to show you (2) how my e-detailing solutions grew the combined sales of three ABC flagship products by a record-breaking 13% in one year (1).

 

Don’t just send a cover letter in Word. Select the most important bits and paste them into your resume cover email: How to Email Your Resume to Get More Job Offers (Examples). It’ll immediately work magic on the recruiter.

 

Worried you might miss something? Don’t worry, we’ve got a checklist guide for you: What to Include in a Cover Letter (15+ Examples & A Complete Guide)

 

 

The most important thing to remember about how to write a cover letter for a job is to personalize it.

 

Address the hiring manager by their name.

 

Identify your potential employers’ needs and show how your past work experience can help them achieve their goals.

 

Don’t just talk about your past responsibilities—focus on your achievements. Provide details and quantify whenever possible.

 

Explain your motivation. Make your future employers feel special: tell them why you want this job, not just any job. Make them feel that you’d like to stay with them for a longer while.

 

Finish strong. Be straightforward about your interest and enthusiasm about the new position.

 

And for the final advice:

 

Keep it short.

 

Do you have any questions about how to create a successful cover letter? Want to share an example of a cover letter? Give us a shout in the comments and we’d be happy to reply!

By Mike Simpson

There comes a time in nearly every job seekers life when you plop yourself down in front of the computer and say to yourself…

“Okay, it’s time to find a couple good cover letter examples I can use to help me start writing my cover letter…” 

So you do a quick Google search, grab the first three cover letter samples you can find, copy a paragraph from each one, and then you’re off to the races feeling like now all you have to do is “click send” a few times and the interviews will simply start rolling in.

Consider this a gentle wake-up call.

Why Your Cover Letter Is So Important?

In this ultra-competitive job market, it’s just not good enough to “Frankenstein” together a cover letter from the various bits and pieces you find online.

Why?

Because hiring managers have “been there, done that.” In other words, they’ve seen it all before.

Not only that, but they want to find candidates that are unique, interesting, and take the time and make the effort to present the best version of themselves.

Your cover letter is your first impression, and therefore, you want to craft the best darn cover letter your hiring manager has ever seen.

So you want to take the time and select the cover letter example that is “tailored” to your situation… in other words, the example cover letter that fits your personality, skills and abilities the best.

Example cover letters are kind of like shoes.

Sure, you might absolutely love that pair of Air Jordan IV’s that are still fresh in the box in your closet from 1989, but you might want to have a second thought before you consider wearing them to a wedding with a tuxedo.

Or perhaps you’ve got a pair of high heels that make you feel like you could walk into a business lunch at the Four Seasons and walk out having sold your company for a billion dollars?

Would you feel the same way if you showed up at the start line for the half marathon you signed up for with those same heels on?

Okay, ridiculous examples aside, I hope you can begin to see my point.

There is not one example cover letter for every situation… no “one-cover-letter-fits-all” solution.

You have to carefully evaluate your situation and decide which cover letter example is going to suit you the most.

What kind of work are you looking for?

Full-time?  Or part-time?  There’s a cover letter for that.

Are you sending a cover letter in the mail or by email?  There’s a cover letter for that too.

There are all kinds of situations that warrant a slightly different cover letter, and it’s imperative that you figure out which one fits you best.

But don’t worry.  To help, we’ve compiled a list of 12 of the most common cover letter examples and provided you with an example of a cover letter for each one.

So take a look at the examples and carefully decide which one fits your situation the most.

Before you dive in, a word to the wise…

Don’t just grab the one that fits you best, change the contact information and then start sending it out. As I said before, hiring managers are pretty smart and will be able to tell that you haven’t taken any time to make it your own.

If you want to get job interviews from your cover letter (and at some point, job offers as well!), you need to “tailor” the cover letter to demonstrate your skills, abilities and relevant experience.

Mike's Tip: Once you find a cover letter example that fits your situation, head over to our article How To Write A Cover Letter 101 and use the article to make sure that your cover letter contains all of the important things that hiring managers look for. We'll help you make sure that your cover letter is so irresistible that you'll get an interview from almost every application you submit!

12 Common Cover Letter Examples

Without further ado, here are 12 of the best cover letter examples for nearly every situation you could find yourself in along with a brief description of what makes the style of cover letter unique.

1. Cover Letter Sample For Part-Time Work

If you have no intention of applying for a full-time position, it is very important that you let the hiring manager know this in your cover letter.  After all, if you don’t mention this right up front, anything that comes after this will be a total waste of time, and hiring managers value their time more than anything.

On a side note, you should never really be applying for a full-time position when you are only available as a part-time worker.  The company has very specific needs, so don’t think they are going to change the entire nature of the position to accommodate your availability.

2. For A New Graduate

Cover letters for new graduates can often be tricky, because generally speaking, new graduates don’t usually have much experience.

So how can you still put yourself forward as a good candidate without experience?  You want to focus the cover letter around your skills and abilities, the extra-curricular work you’ve accomplished and your knowledge of the company (and passion for the industry) you’re applying to.

3. When You Have Been Referred

There isn’t anything overly difficult about writing a cover letter when you have been referred by someone else, but the most important thing to know is where you should bring up the referral.

Generally speaking, it is always best to mention your referral in the opening paragraph, because it acts as an attention grabber for the hiring manager.

You’re hoping they’ll think to themselves something along the lines of, “Oh, this person was referred by Jim.  I like Jim…he’s a straight shooter. If this person is good enough for Jim, he’s good enough for me. I’m going to bring him in for an interview…”

4. Cold Call Cover Letter Example

The cold call cover letter is appropriate when you are applying to a position that is not necessarily listed on a job board or advertised anywhere.  And for that reason, it can be a little tricky.

You really need to blow the hiring manager away in order for them to grant an unsolicited interview request, so there a re a few key things to remember.  Most importantly, you really have to do your research and demonstrate that you know the company and position inside out.

After that, it really pays to address the letter to a specific person.  Simply writing “To Whom It May Concern” is a great way to have the letter filed under G (for those keeping track that’s the Garbage).

Finally, this letter needs to be all about “pizazz”. Since the reader wasn’t expecting to receive this, you really need to catch their attention and sell yourself, but most importantly, quickly demonstrate how you will add value to their company.

5. For An Email Submission

Please please PLEASE be careful with this one.

Just because a job posting says “submit your cover letter and resume via email”, doesn’t necessarily mean that you can just put these documents in the body of an email.

More often than not, the posting will give further instructions that include attaching your cover letter and resume to an email.  Anyone who doesn’t follow this step has a ZERO chance of being brought in for an interview.

Why?  Because you can’t follow simple directions.

Now, if there is no stipulation and you determine that using the email body to send your cover letter is okay, then general cover letter writing rules apply.

Where you want to focus your energy is on the subject line.  Don’t just write whatever comes to mind as a throwaway and whatever you do, don’t leave it empty!  Be clear and concise about what is included in the email and identify the position you are applying for.

6.  For A Recruiter

Recruiters are no different than hiring managers, in that they are essentially looking for the same things from your cover letters.  What impresses a recruiter the most is when you take the time to tailor your cover letter to a specific posting rather than simply sending them a general letter inquiring about “miscellaneous opportunities”.

7. Someone Changing Careers

Generally speaking, if you are changing careers, you’ll be short on experience.  So similarly to the “New Graduate” cover letter, you’ll want to put the focus on your reasons for making the career change along with your relevant skills and abilities and how your experience in your past career will translate to your new career.

And remember, enthusiasm goes a long way. Hiring managers get excited about applicants that really show a desire to succeed in the role and industry they are applying to.

So make sure you do your research and know the position and industry inside out so that you are easily able to show how enthusiastic you are about the opportunity and how determined you are to get started on your new career path.

8. A Great Example of a Cover Letter For An Academic

The trick with an academic cover letter is to avoid rambling on and on and on about everything you’ve accomplished.  The reality is, you still need to fall within the “one-page rule” (although some institutions will allow for a second page, you better make darn sure that this is the case!), so the trick is to be clear and concise and highlight your accomplishments without coming across as an encyclopedia.

One other thing to consider is the nature of any research you have done and how you want to convey that in your cover letter.

Quite often people spend too much time talking about what it is they study or plan on studying without ever getting into the “why” of it all.

Be specific about your intentions and don’t assume that the person on the other end of your cover letter is an expert in your field.

9. For An Internship

There really isn’t a huge difference between writing a cover letter for an internship and writing a cover letter for a job opening.  You still need to list your qualifications, skills and abilities.  You still need to explain how you add value to the company.  You still want to sell yourself.

But one thing you want to keep in mind, is even though this internship might be a springboard to YOUR career or education, you don’t want this to be the focus of your cover letter.

The name of the game is still to put the company’s needs ahead of your own.

You’re not their first intern and you won’t be their last, so don’t write your cover letter thinking that their concern is how the internship will help with your placement in your next opportunity.

Add value. Period.  This is what they really want to hear from you in your cover letter.

10. Direct Mail

A direct mail cover letter is similar to a cold call cover letter, the main difference being you are not applying to a single company with a single position in mind.  Instead, you are “blanketing” as many companies you can at once and therefore trying to send out a general cover letter that can work for them all.

Because of this, we don’t recommend this strategy to our students.  It is generally pretty ineffective and a waste of your time or resources.

There is rarely a time when “tailoring” your resume to a specific company and position is not the most effective strategy.  However, if you are really short on time (and possibly ambition), here is an example of a direct mail cover letter you can reference.

11. Responding To an Advertisement

The only really distinguishing feature of this type of cover letter is that the opening paragraph generally includes a statement such as “I’m responding to your advertisement I saw in the…”

The rest of the cover letter generally follows the principles of other successful cover letters.  However, if you find yourself going through the classifieds in your local newspaper and simply sending off cover letters to whomever has an ad posted, do make sure that you do some research on the company before you send out your cover letter.

Sending one cover letter out for multiple advertisements is a good way to ensure that you won’t be getting too many interviews in the coming days or weeks.

12. When You’re Unemployed

The worst thing you can do when writing an cover letter after you’ve been unemployed for some time is to lie.

Why?  Because eventually, the lies you tell in the cover letter will come home to roost at some point in the interview process, meaning you’ll just end up having wasted everyone’s time.

Having said that, if there are some less-than-attractive reasons for your unemployment, don’t make those reasons the focus of your cover letter. You want to keep it positive.

It’s okay to admit fault in certain situations if you can show that you’ve have learned from the tough times and have changed for the better as a result of these struggles.

Transition to focusing on your skills and abilities, and more importantly, your passion and desire for re-entering the workforce. If you have experience from your past that will clearly add value to this new position, than don’t be afraid to clearly demonstrate the connection.

And if you spent your time being unemployed trying to better yourself (for example, taking a class or volunteering), then shift the focus to that.

Putting It All Together

So there you have 12 good cover letter examples for 2017 that will help you get started on crafting a winning cover letter.

Remember that the most important thing for you to accomplish with your cover letter is to demonstrate how you add value to the company you are applying to, and you want to make sure this never gets lost when you get caught up in trying to sell yourself.

And remember, you’re not on your own! Once you’ve chosen your cover letter example you can head over to How to Write a Cover Letter 101 and get great tips on how to right all parts of your cover letter.

Best of luck to you!

Please be kind and rate this post 🙂

 

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12 Great Cover Letter Examples for 2018

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