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Moulin Rouge Costume Analysis Essay

Essay on Analyzing Moulin Rouge

1200 Words5 Pages

     Moulin Rouge is celebrated for its art direction, music, and performances. One of its biggest endeavors is the set design. With a combination of real sets and computer generated images, Moulin Rouge manages to showcases a 19th century Paris, France as a world of moral decadence but undeniable beauty. The set design further pushes the message of France, at this time, being a place of plague, poverty and sin; but also a place of art, music and beauty.
     In the introduction of the film, we see an elaborate design of 19th century Paris, France. We have a detailed and inside look at Paris through the allies, cabaret bars, prostitutes, and up the rooftops to reveal a colorful and vibrant…show more content…

The elephant room is of course where the prostitutes would take their clients. Color themes are constantly used through out the film. When we see Christian heart broken by the death of Satine, his room is dark and gloomy and has colors of black and dark blue. It further conveys his feeling of depression.
     One of the main Set designs is the inside of the Moulin Rouge. The Moulin rouge has several areas with specific designs. The dance hall, during the “can-can” dance sequence, shows the vibrant colors of the entertainers and dancers which juxtaposes the black and white tuxedo-wearing aristocrats. This is one of the major themes of the film, exemplified through the art direction. All the aristocrats pretty much look the same.
They all have black and white tuxedos, top hats, white gloves, canes, and 19th century facial hair. It’s as if they are dressed as if they‘re in uniform, hiding any individuality they may have. With the black and white colors, it also makes them look emotionless. On the other hand, the dancers and entertainers of the Moulin Rouge, are wearing elaborate, multi-colored dresses with a lot of detail. And each dress, like each dancer, is unique. This is the perfect summary of the film’s theme of how the two types of people live. The aristocrats are emotionless but well groomed and the poor are artistic, talented and full of passion.

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Analysis Of A Scene In The Moulin Rouge

Cinematography is the art or technique of motion-picture photography. The Moulin Rouge is a visually striking film, which incorporates brilliant elements of cinematography. One scene in particular that captures the brilliance of the cinematographer is the scene within which the “Unconscious Argentinean” takes it upon himself to explain the situation with an incredible, tango, adaptation of The Police’s song “Roxanne.” The lighting and other elements of this are gorgeous, as they eloquently convey the dark emotions of the situation: “Jealousy, anger, betrayal.” The different elements of cinematography, specifically, color, lighting, and the use of camera angles, bring to life the emotions, and bigger than life feel to the scene.
The use of different colors in this scene enhance, if not create the mood and tone of the scene. Unambiguously, the use of the two colors, red and blue are used to represent different symbolic meanings, such as the stereotypical “Good and evil” or warmth and cold. As the scene begins, however, the color red is used to represent a sort of heated, lewd, lustful atmosphere that is running juxtaposed with anger and tension felt by both the main character Christian and the viewer, who is made to feel very aggravated at the fact that Saline is forced to finally “dine” with the Duke. Not only is the lighting and set done in tinges of red, but even the costume of the Argentinean consists of a red satin suit vest. As the scene progresses, and the tango begins, the female role of the dance is introduced under a blue tinted lighting insinuating a cold, bitter, indifference that seems almost sickening. Since the female role of the tango is meant to be a very symbolic role in itself, it is only appropriate that this motif of blue lighting is carried over to the metaphorically symbolized characters, and actions portrayed in the tango. The scenes incorporated into this selection, of the Duke and Saline in the Gothic Tower, are all shot under an intense blue filter. This same blue coloring portrays to the viewer a very immoral sense of things between the Duke and Saline. On an opposing note, the color red seems to be consistently present within the scenes, whether it is the deep red color of Saline’s lipstick, or the mahogany coloring of the table. These hints of colors from the red inside the Moulin Rouge being also present inside the tower, to the blue in the Gothic Tower also being present in the Moulin Rouge connects the two places with a common motif of color.
Another element of cinematography that helps create this visually striking scene selection is the intricate use of lighting. The...

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